The Best Companies for Working Moms

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No one would say that being a working parent is easy. If you have a newborn at home, good luck getting more than a few hours of sleep each night. Once your children are in school and participating in extracurricular activities, you have to pick them up at one place and drop them off at another. Don’t forget the overall pressure of having another human being relying on you for food, shelter and clothing. You have enough responsibilities to make parenting a full-time job without ever having to set foot in an office.

And if no reasonable person would claim the life of a working parent is easy, you probably won’t find anyone who thinks working mothers have had an easy time balancing work and family. Working women have faced an uphill battle for generations and still do. As we’ve pointed out, don’t be an attractive woman who wants a traditionally masculine job or you’ll be sorely disappointed. Progress has a long way to go.

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But the situation for working women in 2010 is better than in previous generations, as we have recently noted. As that study explains, 20-something single women are the ones making the greatest financial gains, and experts suspect that this is because many women wait to get married and have children in their 30s and 40s. Essentially, once a woman becomes a mother, her professional life becomes more affected than that of her male counterparts. Each couple decides how it wants to divvy up the daily responsibility, but women still seem to be the ones who leave work to pick up the children from school or who stay home if they get sick.

Realizing that mothers – and women who plan on having children – have extra factors to consider in a job hunt, Working Mother magazine has compiled a list of the best places to work. The Working Mother 100 Best Companies list is based on “work force, compensation, child care, flexibility programs, leave policies” and other factors affecting workplace productivity and culture.

For any worker, especially a working mother, access to on-site child care or the ability to telecommute is important for balancing work and life. Working Mother magazine says that the companies on the list are ahead of most national organizations. For example, only 37 percent of nationwide companies offer health insurance for part-time workers, whereas 100 percent of the companies on the list do.

Although the list is presented in no particular order, 10 companies were highlighted as being the top finishers. They are, in alphabetical  order:

You can view the 90 other companies here.

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48 Comments
  1. With equal opportunity and all it’s good that women are able to work in the corporate environment; however, in an ideal environment the parents should not have to compromise the time with their kids. Flexibility is what is lacking in the job market. With the added pressure of the lousy economy, corporate jobs are a lot more stressful these days.

    Everybody has some useful skill or experience. However, they are unable to capitalize on it due to lack of time, confidence, and money for initial investment. However, hope is still there. For example, Common People Services (http://www.commonpeopleservices.com) is a company that is enabling several new job opportunities for people across the US, and are even empowering people with free solutions and training so that they can create their own job without compromising on their current schedule or investing a single additional penny. There’s bound to be other such companies that will crop up in the recent future to empower the people to have a more balanced life.

    • think moms got it so bad?…try actually dealing with an employer who doesnt care one bit whether you get a day off or not….then try finding anyone willing to watch a newborn for not less than 10 hours a day…everyday…were not talking about sitting behind a desk…or any jobs women couldnt possibly do…

      i find it offensive that women get handed so much much while screaming for equal rights, but have been screaming for just the opposite in the court sytem….

    • I agree about it being ALOT more stressful. Family time is out the door. Our hours were changed to an earlier start to get finished earlier so we could have family time, but all we are doing now is working later with fewer people with the same amount of work. Bottom line is all that matters.

    • What this type of articles neglect to tell you is that a lot of mothers that work in Corporate America are not executives. The only women that get the flexibility 9 times out of 10 are executives. So no, this article is and many others like them are lies. Or at least only telling half the story.

    • I am a nurse and I take care of many people and do my best to ensure they recieve great care.It is unfortunate that Hospitals and healthcare facilities do not acknowledge working mothers and even penalize working mothers needing a more family friendly environment.We as a profession are always pressured to work more hours and told this is an aspect of this profession.I do not agree no company should have the right to require their employee to sacrafice their family life

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  17. Although it may sound very ridiculous, arranging the EDUCATIONAL-TRAINING/SYSTEM in a way (sth like the A/O levels, but not exactly) that school years get over as fast as possible with approx 6 MONTHS PER PRESENT GRADE/STANDARD (eg, by puberty, viz, around 9-12 years old), followed by community-supportive-supported WORK-STUDY-MARRIAGES SOLUTION, followed by essential higher-working-FUNCTIONALITY-BASIS college (initial) years finish off by 15-19 years old ALONGWITH the simultaneous processes of maturity-responsibility-enduring, multi-tasking, family-building, young-age-RIGHT-multiple-socializing, NET IN-TOTO PRODUCTIVITY BETTER THAN IF OTHERWISE. MANY INTELLECTUALS PROBABLY AGREE. OTHERS DRIVEN BY INDUCED POPULAR BIAS MAY NEVER EVEN BOTHER. CO-WIVES R A BLESSING IN THAT IT PREVENTS PROBLEMS LIKE RAPE, PROSTITUTION, ETC, PLUS U CAN TAKE “SHIFTS” OR “ALTERNATIONS” OR EVEN COMPANY FOR SHOPPING, KID-CARE, SECURITY, ETC, INSTEAD OF BEING TOO FAMILIAR &TIRED OF UR DAILY MONOTONOUS SCHEDULES & UR HUSSIES. TAKES THE LOAD OFF HIM AS WELL. JUST DO IT THE RIGHT WAY, THAT’S ALL. ALSO THE KIDS GET TO LEARN VARIOUS “SOCIETY” STARTING AT HOME WITH FAMILY ITSELF, & BETTER, WITH COMPANY & EARLY-AGE-MULTI-VALUE-FORMATION, INSTEAD OF POPULAR NUCLEAR & JOINT FAMILY CONSIDERATIONS BUT ENDING UP PURPOSELESS/USELESS REBELS/LONERS/ANTI-SOCIALS/ADDICTS OF MANY SORTS.

  18. I work for one of these Top Ten companies as a working mother, and I can tell you that it’s a joke. First, companies self-nominate to make it onto these lists, and implement programs to make it appear they’re parent-friendly (e.g., flex time, leave policies, etc.). What they don’t tell you is that if you take advantage of any of these programs, you will be making a career-limiting move. If your first priority is your family rather than your firm, you will be at a career disadvantage, reflected in your pay, promotions, and opportunities made available to you (special projects, assignments, etc.). The working mother programs do not level the playing field one bit. Second, unlike other “best place to work” surveys, this one doesn’t actually poll the working mothers at the organizations. Not a very reliable survey. You’d hear a very different story if you spoke to the working mothers at these organizations. If you look at the very top leadership positions, you will find that it’s still male-dominated; the few women at or near the top are typically not mothers, or have “stay at home” husbands, which makes them the primary breadwinners — not how I would characterize most “working mothers”. Everytime I see an article like this, and my company appears on the list, the list loses most of its credibility.

  19. Ok.. geez guys.. its saturday morning..why post an article about careers and jobs.. I think we need to not think about that on Saturday and try to cheer up a bit.. i know just the thing.. a friend of mine sent me this hilarious site yesterday.. it’s a website for a politically incorrect cookbook.. cracked me up.. I can’t tell you the name of it.. cause some of you will freak out.. but if you google “whipped and beaten culinary works” you can find it.. but don’t go if you can’t take a joke and are uptight.. seriously.. and cheer the heck up! you’ll give yourselves heart attacks!

  20. Is there information on the methodology that was used to determine which companies would make the list? For example, was any analysis done of actual usage and application of the policies? Was a valid statistical sample conducted of actual current and former women employees of the companies who either already were or who became working mothers while employed?

    Based on stories about such “Best Places” listings on business related sites, many of these surveys appear to be little more than self-reported beauty contests in which the PR departments of the companies completed survey sheets with little or no effort done to verify the accuracy of the responses.

    The companies probably have exemplary formal policies established at the corporate level. However, based on annecdotal evidence about actual employee relations practices at the business unit level at several of the companies listed in the Top 10 that I’ve seen posted on various business blogs, there is a possibly a big difference between policy and reality.

    The postings I’ve seen include examples of women being selected for termination shortly after becoming pregnant or returning to work after giving birth, mothers being marginalized in responsibility and pay as a result of having to take any time to fulfill parental responsibilities, mothers being passed over for promotion, etc. I won’t mention the names of the companies that I’ve seen represented in the blog postings, because I the blog posting presents only one side of the issues. However, if the blog postings are true, when it comes to actual application of the policies in the operations of some of these Top 10 companies, there is a huge gap between the image of being a good place for mothers to work and the reality of what mothers face in the work place.

    These surveys should be taken with a huge grain of salt. Before assuming that a place a “mother friendly” because it is high on any magazine’s list, do some background research. Talk with current anf former employees who are mothers. Find out what the reality is at the unit where you are considering working.

  21. I think it’s smarter that women are taking the time in their 20s to work and develop some career-related skills and then having children when they are older. Add to the list of things to consider when choosing a job–options/flexibility for working parents.

    • I think this girl has the right idea. You girls get your degrees in your early years. Then have your families. Your degree will be there when the kids are grown. Find some way to stay in the mix through the years. Do some night classes to stay current with your degree. Its a no brainer…….Everybody wins especially the kids, they need mom, and the dad needs some home cooked meals, and loven when he gets home…..

  22. Its so great to hear that companies are making an effort towards helping working moms balance their lives. I am fortunate enough to work for myself and be able to set my own hours –I never found a company that was flexible enough for the family lifestyle I wanted. I hope we will see more flexible work arrangements for both men and women — with the Internet and today’s technology, it makes so much sense. People can be efficient at their jobs without being tied to a desk from 9-5.

  23. The big four; Deloitte, PWC, KPMG, E&Y should NOT be on the list at all. Each of these companies are designed with an ‘up or out’ model that requires you to grind it out 24 hours a day or else. Look at their turn-over rates each year; 30%+. I’ve worked for both KPMG and Deloitte and I know what goes on at each of these firms. REVENUE first, second, and LASTLY, or else. Whatever the evaluation criteria was to get on this list, it sure didn’t consider work-life balance. Find a member of these firms who routinely has the opportunity to sit down to dinner with their families at 5:30/6pm and I will call them a slacker by their firm standards. You know something is wrong when these firms tee up ‘after-hour’ day care facilities to assist (at the employee expense). Do the math; these companies are upper successful with generating revenue and offering the financial rewards at a super heafty price on your personal life.

  24. It is the unpopular thing to say but the problems with kids today and for years to come will be all because of the working mom. There just is no replacement for a mother being with her child rather than the mother working. The name for that is “half assed”. Yeah, I’m sure I’ll be pointed to as a neanderthal and all but it is what it is. I also am an employer who sees that working moms also do a half-assed job of the job they are giving up the kids for, too. I think the entire concept of a “working mom” is a disaster. My mom worked but she only did so when we really needed extra money and only on shifts that allowed my Dad to be with us when she was working. I mean, why have children at all if you are going to be absent at the most critical time of raising a child because of some naive notion of importance in your job/career. That is what is truly pathetic about the “career women” out there. NO one gives a crap about your accomplishments in a job. I can see the necessity of working if you are a single mom but it is stil just as sad because your kid is missing out………….no two ways to slice it.

    • Have you ever considered that it might be in the child’s best interest for his or her mother to work? For example, what if something tragic were to happen to dad, and he’s not able to provide for the family (loss of job, medical emergency, or even death)? Wouldn’t it be best if mom had a proper education and career to be able to support everyone? It’s not just about a working mom’s feeling of accomplishment — it’s also about the very real financial contribution she makes to support her family, especially when times are tough. So unless mom or dad are independently wealthy, would you concede that it’s important for mom to be able to provide for her family in case things don’t work out the way you planned?

    • Unfortunately, the half assed workers working for you are probably due to your choice of employees. There are good workers and bad workers. They can be male, female, mothers, teenagers, etc. The fact that you didn’t get high-octane workers working for you is your own problem. Don’t generalize working mothers.
      I’m a mother of a 2 year old. I’d go crazy if I stayed home and took care of my daughter 24/7. She goes to a good daycare 3 days a week. I have flex hours and work from home options. My daughter learns a lot playing with her friends at daycare, and the daycare lady has 30+ years of experience to teach me as a first time mother. Children who go to daycare tend to be more social and better prepared for elementary school. People might say I got lucky with a good employer and daycare situation. But truly, luck is in favor of those who worked hard to postion themselves in the postion to be lucky.

  25. The title of this article alienates single working fathers like myself. Juggling a pre-teen (11 yr old) with work and the rest of life is just as hard on us guys.

  26. Equal opportunities demand equal responsibility except, apparently, if you’re a woman and have been coddled by big gov’t by way of gender biased ‘affirmative action’ in education and employment lo these last 30 + years.

    Deny it all you want but:

    There is a price to be paid for the legions of men out of work in this latest downturn: socio-economicall, family support, self-esteem, crime rates and the list goes on.

    I have 3 college degrees, have been out of even a part-time, low-skilled job for 18+ months.

    I conducted an experiment some 7-8 years ago: sent 2 identical resumes in to a job opening ad. They were identical except for the name on the resume: One was my name and the other was a femal first name w/ my last name.

    Guess who got the phone call response to the resume? Wasn’t me!

    affirmative action/ quotas work if you aren’t a white male. Thy ask on job apps so they can fill quotas in edu and employment.

  27. I have to agree, at least for me, EY was great. I got a five month leave with both of my kids and three months of it was paid. I was not treated badly for taking my leave either. I kept that job until I quit, I was not laid off either. Great company perks wise!

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  32. Thanks , I have recently been looking for info about this subject for ages and yours is the greatest I’ve discovered till now. But, what about the bottom line? Are you sure about the source?

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