6 transportation jobs that can move your career

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Mechanics at workCars, trains, trucks, planes and boats: they’re the vehicles that move us and our economy, driving the market forward and delivering products and goods to consumers. As the economy continues to recover, more workers are needed to keep transportation and delivery needs met and moving. And in an industry that’s projected to grow 7.2 percent within the next five years, according to Economic Modeling Specialists International and Supply & Demand 2013 data, transportation workers are in high demand.

There were over 4 million jobs in transportation and logistics in 2012, and there is currently one driver for every five opportunities, according to EMSI and Supply & Demand 2013 data. In an industry that’s thriving and calls for more workers, how can you sort through the options and find work that will move your career in the right direction?

The answer may be in one site: JobsInMotion.com. Powered by CareerBuilder, this niche site solely focuses on jobs in the transportation and logistics industry, offering job seekers customized results that fit their career goals and matches them with employers who are just as serious about the industry.

However, if you’re new to the industry or are looking to get experience, this could be the right field for you. Most roles require a high school diploma or equivalent, as well as special licensing or certifications for some occupations. But this industry also offers hands-on training and apprenticeships, and can be a great option for veterans, who are twice as likely as non-vets to work in transportation, according to EMSI and Supply & Demand 2013 data.

Whether you’re returning to a civilian life, looking for a new job or are interested in taking the next step to move your career in the right direction, consider any of these top job postings on JobsInMotion.com:

Automotive service technicians and mechanics* inspect, maintain and repair cars and light trucks.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 17 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $35,790

Delivery drivers pick up, transport and drop off packages within a small region or urban area. Most of the time, they transport merchandise from a distribution center to businesses and households.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 13 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $27,050

Diesel service technicians and mechanics inspect, repair or overhaul buses, trucks and anything else with a diesel engine.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 15 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $40,850

Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers transport goods from one location to another. Most tractor-trailer drivers are long-haul drivers and operate trucks with a capacity of at least 26,001 pounds per gross vehicle weight. They deliver goods over intercity routes, sometimes spanning several states.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 21 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $37,770

Machinists set up and operate a variety of computer-controlled or mechanically-controlled machine tools to produce precision metal parts, instruments, and tools.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 7 percent growth
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
2010 median annual pay: $39,910

Material handlers transport objects without using machines. Some workers move freight, stock or other materials around storage facilities; others clean vehicles; some pick up unwanted household goods and still others pack materials for moving.
Job outlook, 2010-20: 14 percent growth
Entry-level education: Less than high school
2010 median annual pay: $22,560

*Job descriptions, education levels and salary figures are from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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